Corpos estrangeiros por David Rickard na galeria Copperfield

 Corpos estrangeiros por David Rickard na galeria Copperfield
International Airspace glass vessel 2020. ‘International Airspace’ is contained within a Pyrex glass cylinder. Following dialogue with the School of Chemistry at Leicester University it has evolved [from a small glass sphere] into the cylinder [above). The School of Chemistry also helped by forming the final vessel within the glass blowing lab.

Foreign Bodies by David Rickard

Art exhibition

In David Rickard’s art exhibition at the Copperfield gallery in London, Rickard continues his exploration of making art through collaboration–a creative tool that the New Zealander uses once again in his new work Foreign Bodies. He uses it to challenge the gradual solidification of international borders (such as Donald Trump’s wall and the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union [Brexit]) and to explore ideas around the international agreements that allow our interconnected world to function Read interview with David Rickard

Exhibition background about the artworks on show, courtesy of the Copperfield gallery

International Airspace

The air that surrounds us today has been in circulation for centuries. In fact, within every breath we take it’s likely that we intake at least one molecule of the air exhaled by Caesar over two thousand years ago. Besides its longevity, air is also highly transient; the air we breathe in London will spread around the northern hemisphere within two weeks and across the entire globe within approximately two years. This gas we inhale, deep into our bodies with every breath, has already passed through countless bodies and borders.

International Airspace postage boxes 2020
International Airspace postage boxes 2020

The work International Airspace returns to the twenty-seven signing countries of the Paris Convention to form a new collaborative air space, one hundred years after the original agreement.

With the signing of the Paris Convention in 1919, national borders were elevated from the ground to dissect the atmosphere into national airspaces. Aligned with inland borders and set twelve nautical miles from coastlines, these new invisible boundaries responded to the recent arrival of air power. Governance of the sky formed the principles of co-operation needed for international air travel and created vast areas of shared in-between sky known as ‘international airspace’. The current trend for the devolution of international politics in favour of nationalism, has already began to test some of the most fundamental agreements between nations including the invisible accords that control our skies.

The work International Airspace returns to the twenty-seven signing countries of the Paris Convention to form a new collaborative air space, one hundred years after the original agreement. Through exchange with people from each of the signatory countries, local air samples have been collected, combined and then used to blow a glass vessel, a new fragile international airspace built on trust and collaboration. Together with this new airspace are the packages that traversed the globe for each sample, bearing the postal marks and customs checks needed to undertake their journeys.

Continuing a journey through borders, the work Globus has swallowed its own surface. Formed from a Jerry Can, once used to transport fuel or water, the vessel is perforated until largely transparent, revealing a sphere of aluminium inside. Cast from the material removed from the vessel’s skin and too large to fit through its mouth, the solid globe remains internalised within the body from which it is formed.

Globulus

Continuing a journey through borders, the work Globus has swallowed its own surface. Formed from a Jerry Can, once used to transport fuel or water, the vessel is perforated until largely transparent, revealing a sphere of aluminium inside. Cast from the material removed from the vessel’s skin and too large to fit through its mouth, the solid globe remains internalised within the body from which it is formed.

Globus 2019
Globus 2019

Ritmo Distante

Spanning the globe with a distant rhythm are two drum sticks, one formed from an Olive tree located in Algaidas, Spain and the other from Mangrove tree on the other side of the world in Kopu, New Zealand.

This unlikely pair of sticks sustain a rhythm which crosses the globe on every beat. With cadence rhythms originally developed to sustain pace and energy during long marches, the antipodal sticks echo the journeys undertaken to bring them together alongside the wider politics of movement, migration and power. Read more about Distant Rhythm in interview with the artist

Ritmo Distante 2019
Ritmo Distante 2019

David Rickard: Corpos estrangeiros na galeria Copperfield, Londres

Quarta a sábado até 18 de abril de 2020